0 In Real Ghost Stories

The Ghosts Of Oundle

oundle ghosts and hauntings

The small county town of Oundle in Northamptonshire, just a few miles from Peterborough, is packed with ancient buildings, intriguing alleyways, old inns and one of the finest churches in the Midlands. When you delve into its haunted history, you discover some of the most intriguing and historical hauntings in the whole of England.

The Talbot Hotel, Oundle

The Talbot Hotel is haunted by the sound of a woman crying at night. The ghost also appears in a long white dress and stands at the top of the stairs or by the window of the conference room opposite. The staircase and windows where the ghost appears were brought here from Fotheringhay when the castle was demolished. It is assumed that the ghost is that of Mary, Queen of Scots who, while standing at the top of these stairs received the news that she would be executed the following day.

On one occasion a guest staying in the next room heard the sound of a woman sobbing bitterly from room No.5, yet the room was empty at the time. The date was the anniversary of Mary’s death.

Mary has been seen walking down the upper flight of the staircase and has also been witnessed standing near the reception counter. She has also been seen looking down into the yard from a window on the landing and is easily recognisable by her white blouse and white cap. She can only be seen by men.

Mary has been seen walking down the upper flight of the staircase and has also been witnessed standing near the reception counter. She has also been seen looking down into the yard from a window on the landing and is easily recognisable by her white blouse and white cap. She can only be seen by men.

Drumming Well Yard is the passageway that leads from the main street to the rear of the hotel. It takes its name from the well that was once located here, which warned of impending natural disasters by emitting loud drumming noises. Thus it predicted the Fire of London and the deaths of King Charles II and Oliver Cromwell, as well as other events up to the late 18th century.

the haunted cottage in oundle in northamptonshire
The Haunted Cottage in Oundle, Northamptonshire

Nene Cottage, Oundle

Once an inn, this beautiful 17th century cottage was restored to a home in the 1970’s, the restoration caused the new owners to be alarmed since it seemed to have awoken a ghost!

They experienced the rattling of door-handles, particularly in the late afternoon. The spare bedroom was also found to have a rather unusual atmosphere. When new owners took over the manifestations became more frequent and shadows were seen on the walls of the affected bedroom together with footsteps that were heard at night.

There have been two reported apparitions at the cottage. One is of a young girl with long black hair, seen crouching near an outhouse, wearing what looks like a nightdress. The other is of a young boy with long fair hair, wearing early 20th century-style clothes, who has been seen leaping around the garden before disappearing through the garden wall.

The Ship Inn, Oundle

Dating from the fourteenth century, the origin of its ghost dates from recent times. A former landlord committed suicide by throwing himself from the window of a bedroom. His ghost has appeared many times to previous licensees and guests passing by in the street.

39a West Street (Now Oxfam)

In the 1930s an ordinary drapery shop was the centre of a terrifying incidents. Situated on West Street, the shop was housed in one of the oldest buildings in Oundle. This age-old building made of grey stone, had long low passages and a maze of rooms with historic architecture that gave the building an air of mystery.

Bangings, knockings and shufflings in the building became an everyday occurrence to the Seamark family that lived there. In the 1930s there were many reports of the family being awakened in the dead of night by tapping on the bedroom door, but refreshingly, the Seamarks paid little attention to what they considered a, “minor disturbances”, and sleep on till morning. When guests came to stay, the night time activity increased with sounds of hurrying footsteps and scurryings, Vivian Seamark remarked at the time, “We had a lady friend come to stop with us some time ago and it didn’t dawn on us to mention these strange goings on…she told us next morning about being woken up and scared out of her wits by the sound of someone trying to get into her room.”

The Seamarks experienced a range of activity but mostly between 2am and 4am, the mother, Fanny Seamark, heard footsteps in the passage outside the room, and immediately afterwards came distinct tappings on the door.  Interestingly, when she opened the door, the passage was empty, and then realised that the footsteps couldn’t have come from the passage as it is now, as it was covered in thick carpet.

When the Seamarks undertook research into the history of the building that included a department store next door, is that it was once the site of a Roman Catholic church and was consecrated ground.

Their neighbour, Mr Crick equally had strange experiences, one night he was in the rear of his shop about nine o’clock talking on the telephone when there was a shattering noise like the crashing of a dozen biscuit tins. “I dashed into the shop, there was not a tin on the floor, and nobody was there. It beat me,” Mr Crick told the Peterborough Citizen and Advertiser, February 10th 1936.

Photo by philip jackson from FreeImages and Eduard Militaru on Unsplash

You Might Also Like